What Happens In A Lesson?

Alexander technique teacher applying positioning to man's extended armLessons generally take place in a one-to-one environment between teacher and pupil. Alexander Technique is occasionally taught in a group environment, though the one-to-one scenario is far more effective in delivering the feedback necessary in order to learn how we react to stimuli. One of the reasons for this is because feedback is delivered both vocally, and physiologically, i.e. the teacher places his/her hands on the pupil in order to point out areas of unnecessary tension, and to direct the body in a different way. In the group scenario, this form of feedback is not so effective, and so group work is generally only recommended as an introduction to the work.

But…

The Alexander Technique is by no means a ‘quick fix’. Unlearning or re-educating oneself in new patterns of use, when old patterns have been ingrained in us since birth, is not a process which occurs quickly or easily in most cases. The principles of the technique must be continually applied for it to remain effective throughout ones life, as our environment is constantly changing and we change in relation to it, and we meet the new demands that those changes bring.

New environments bring new stimuli, and without refreshing the way in which we react to stimuli, we end up relying on habitual patterns of use.

The Lesson…